Training progression

We often get trainees who want their Michigan Concealed Pistol License, but could use some extra work on shooting fundamentals. Many of our trainees who pass the CPL shooting requirements voluntarily go back and brush up on basics. We are incredibly thankful to have such dedicated trainees who take the responsibilities of being armed that seriously.

Similarly, we have many trainees who get their CPL and want to go beyond the “proficiency demonstration” of the CPL class to improve their skills and prepare them for the parameters present in an actual altercation. We applaud this, and have multiple offerings that do just that.

Note that we are not “all about the gun”. We emphasize physical force training as well, and are happy to refer students to qualified intermediate force training venues as well.

This is our training map. The courses we have, and the progression we recommend taking them in, to help equip our students with protection proficiency.

2020 Class offerings available

Our site is up with the currently scheduled 2020 class offerings. Our current fare continues to include our standard classes:

  • Family Firearm Safety
  • Essential Handgun
  • Michigan Concealed Pistol
  • Michigan CPL Renewal
  • Martial Gunfighting
  • Firearm Cleaning and Maintenance
  • Personal Protection
  • Tactical Tomahawk
  • Emergency Preparedness 1
  • Emergency Preparedness 2

Additionally, we are in the process of securing a venue to host our intermediate classes:

  • Intermediate Handgun 1: Foundational skills for operating the handgun in a protection-intent situation.
  • Intermediate Handgun 2: Environmental factors for operating the handgun in a protection situation (protective moment, cover/concealment).

Lastly, we are excited to announce our latest class, Emergency Preparedness 3! This class will be hands-on with YOUR emergency kit and contents. Building shelter, purifying water, starting fire, and more! Expect situational considerations and survival prioritization to be a big part of what you will face.

We sincerely hope you are getting trained up to protect you and your circle, regardless of the nature of the threats we may face. Whether through us or other great educators, investing in your skill set is the most value for your dollars you can get.

Safe travels

With the holiday season approaching, many families will be setting out by car or mass transit to other destinations. Whether to escape the frigid winter or visit family, this escape from routine brings up a few questions to the protection and preparedness mindset. Here’s some common concerns…

IMPORTANT: We are not lawyers and we did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. It REMAINS the reader’s responsibility to determine the legalities of protection tools and actions in the various governing body regions in which they travel.

Can I take my handgun in my vehicle (no CPL)?

In general, the Firearms Owners Protection Act of 1986 created a “Safe Passage” clause in the US Code that allowed for interstate travel with a firearm (unloaded, not accessible to vehicle occupants). The stipulation was that if the firearm was legal to possess at the departure point, and legal to possess at the destination point, then the owner was immune to all strict gun control measures in between. This supposed that the “in between” did not include anything other than brief stops (food, gas, bio-breaks, overnight lodging as necessary).

It should be noted that many over-zealous legislatures and LEO’s have made stops on people, and pressed charges, based on characteristics of the firearm that were made illegal in state/municipality areas. Local laws such as magazine size restrictions, or other firearm features are often attempted to be prosecuted despite the safe passage laws.

If you are traveling, be sure to review the laws in each state you will be traveling through, as well as the levels in which states restrict the rights of the people. Know the laws, know the prescribed method of transport, and drive in such a manner that your “just passing through” goes unnoticed.

Can I take my handgun in my vehicle (with CPL)?

Because each state infringes on the Second Amendment to varying degrees, and because Concealed Pistol Licenses are handled at the state level, navigating where you can and cannot carry concealed with your CPL can be challenging. Many states have ‘reciprocity’ with one another: they will honor your CPL in their state since people from their state have theirs honored while visiting your state. Driver’s licenses enjoy this reciprocity state-to-state throughout the nation. CPL isn’t as encompassing, yet.

To start, look at every single state you will drive through. Then go to a website that is devoted to concealed carry reciprocity and see the results. DON’T STOP THERE. Trusting some web site isn’t the best move in the world. A good reciprocity map will have links to the attorney generals’ opinions from each state granting reciprocity. Review these carefully. Heck, even print them and put them in a small notebook. If you encounter a preference-enforcing government official, you will have access to the determination right there. At the very least, you will be able to demonstrate you did due-diligence before your travels.

IMPORTANT: You must carry concealed in a manner prescribed by the state you are in, and follow THEIR laws when carrying concealed. In Michigan, a “no gun” sign carries little legal weight. You must leave the premises if told to. In some states, that no-gun sign has rule of law. There are many other differences about where, when, and how concealed carry is permitted. You must know them all for each state you travel.

Big ole jet airliner… Flying with your firearm.

In public aircraft (not a private charter airplane), you may obviously not bring your firearm in carry-on with you. You must put in in checked baggage.

The TSA has this to say on the matter:

  • Firearms must be unloaded.
  • Firearms must be in a locked hard sided case. Only you should have the key.
  • Firearms must be declared to the airlines when checking the baggage.
  • Ammunition must be in checked baggage only.
  • Ammunition must be transported in a box designed to transport ammunition.

Similar to the “Safe Passage” rules above, the firearm must be legal to own at your departure point and at the landing point.

An interesting side note occurs when you must retrieve your baggage by exiting the secured area of the airport, getting baggage, then checking in to a connecting flight (say, 2 different airlines). There have been at least a couple instances were the authorities have been summoned because the firearm had characteristics not legal in that area. Depending on the political climate, this can be as simple as going on your way, or as complicated as “we will be making a lesson of you”.

If your flight has connections that require you to retrieve your checked baggage, understand the procedures for getting your baggage to the new check in area. If the flight is unanticipatedly diverted, talk to the airline crew once you exit the plane to make plans to have your carry-on moved by them, without you reclaiming it at baggage claim.

Always call ahead to your airlines to understand any accommodations that must be made by their policies. In a line at the airport is not a good place for a learn-as-you-go experience.

IMPORTANT: If you regularly use your trusty ole daypack as a range bag, and plan to use it as a carry on, spend a ridiculous amount of time ensuring there is no ammunition in the bag. Too many people are put in small rooms with uncomfortable chairs and subjected to questioning from officials from unfriendly.gov simply because of a few stray rounds of niner mike mike they didn’t shoot up last Saturday…

Do people still take trains?

Trains have a very similar policy as airlines. Firearms must be packaged appropriately, and in checked baggage. Amtrack has guidelines here.

International travel

The USA infringes on peoples’ firearm rights to a lesser extent than most other governments in the world. That being said, there are a number of countries that will honor your ability to own a firearm, though most will not honor your ability to carry it, concealed or otherwise. Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Panama, and South Africa have relatively easy to access CPL requirements.

First, before your departure, understand how to fly with your firearm. You’ll want to declare your firearm to Customs using the Form 4457 and get it signed. This helps your return to the US with that firearm as proof it was not acquired abroad.

Know where the US Embassy is when going abroad, and have that phone number recorded.

Knowledge and skills are not subject to laws

We regularly promote training beyond the gun. Everything from situational awareness to first aid courses to strong physical-level martial classes. These are where protection begins. Awareness gives you the much needed “heads up” something is amiss. Physical force gives you an edge no matter the type of conflict. Whether just confidence (there are nonverbal cues a person who knows how to handle himself gives off), the ability to repel a non-lethal attack, or the skills to get at your firearm in a mixed-force attack, martial skills come into play across the entire use of force spectrum.

These skills prepare you for interpersonal conflict. These cannot be outlawed (knowledge cannot be contained by any government entity). They cannot be seized at the border, and they do not rely on the possession of a thing in order to work (though weapons enhance these skills).

2019 In The Books!

We (Berge and Don) have had an amazing year with the opportunity to train some of the finest peaceable and responsible students. We are regularly honored and humbled at the trust you, our students, place in us. The skills we practice in are life and death, readiness for an encounter, preparedness for when bad things happen, and so much more. We do not take our roles in this regard lightly, and we both draw from our knowledge, training, and experiences to deliver you the most up to date, and grounded in reality information we can.

We had an excellent shooting season! Our classes were small enough (we do not want to be a 30+ student classroom) to be able to provide a very favorable instructor to student ratio which really allowed us to focus in on the drills being presented and the foundational skills necessary to master them.

In addition to a great shooting season, this year we had record attendance in our martial offerings (Personal Protection and Tactical Tomahawk) and our Emergency Preparedness (EP 1 and EP2) offerings, with our alumni stepping up to use our coupon codes. We are very thankful for this! The threats we face as Michigan individuals and families isn’t always a lethal force encounter, and isn’t even always an interpersonal conflict.

As we look to 2020, we will be offering more classes, with a return of our Intermediate Handgun series (levels 1 and 2), and a level 3 series of our Emergency Preparedness course later in the year.

Join us!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 7

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 7. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Are you almost done with it?

Air

Early last week we identified some air filters that are suitable for your family’s needs in your area. We made a note of them and even revisited the subject and made sure. Time to Add to Cart.

TASK: Add the air filters to cart. Purchase the air filters needed.

Amazon Prime memberships are great for this sort of thing. They have a dizzying array of product and free shipping on many items.

Shelter

Earlier this week we did a tool and equipment assessment. If your finances are able, fill in the tools and equipment you do not have. This includes tools as well as hardware like fasteners and raw materials like 2×4’s and plywood.

TASK: Purchase or otherwise obtain the tools you need. Keep an eye on Facebook Marketplace or Craigslist for materials.

Hydration

Today we take a break from filling 2 liter bottles. Let’s talk about water and what it means to have clean water. Ideally in our bottles we have H2O, only H2O, and nothing else but H2O. In reality, that isn’t the case. We have as couple terminology points:

Purification: Water purification is the act of ensuring only H2O is in our water container. It consists primarily of filtration and disinfecting.

Filtration: The act of passing water through a medium such that impurities are captured by the medium and not allowed to pass though. Real world filtration may not catch all impurities and some viruses are smaller than filter elements. Improper filtering technique can also allow impurities to make it through the system.

Disinfection: The act of rendering impurities in the water inert. Disinfection is primarily done through an additive, such as chlorine tablets or iodine tablets. Ultraviolet light is now becoming more common with sterilization “pens” that are immersed in the container and emit light to kill viruses and other microorganisms.

Nutrition

For the past week we have been assessing our food needs. Today, we are looking at the lists we’ve made. These should be foods and ingredients that are in long term, medium term, and short term categories.

Indefinite term foods might be good for a year or more. Virtually all canned goods are long term foods. dried rice, dry pasta, wheat berries, sugar, honey, and many more ingredients are long term. These are EXCELLENT foods to stock up on.

Long term goods will keep for a week or so, and ideally without refrigeration. Some commercial baked goods like cookies, crackers, butter, syrups, and more fit this category. These are also great items to stock up on for a week of preparedness.

Short term goods will go bad within about a week, especially with loss of refrigeration. Milk, prepared vegetables, breads, and other foods of this nature are short term. These are poor items to “stock up” on, but in the event of an emergency are OK to get prior to, but understand they may not last.

TASK: Stock up on long and indefinite term food item inventory suitable for one person for an entire week. 3 meals a day, 2000 calories each day, and something they identify as “food” (not MREs or other emergency rations that may be alien to them).

TASK: Establish a FIFO (first in, first out) system in your pantry.

The objective is not to have these emergency foods in some bin or set aside. The objective is to have extra foods in your pantry so that if an emergency happens, you have inventory.

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

This week we made maps to our workplaces and other frequently traveled areas and have been observing useful resources and concerns.

TASK: On your maps, mark main routes as the primary route taken and ensure all resources and concerns are noted. Mark off waypoints along the way and name them. These should be easy to understand features.

Training

Enroll at least one family member in a First Aid, CPR, AED course.

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 6

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 6. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

No tasks for Air today!

Shelter

Yesterday we did an assessment of our skill set AND we started a common home repair book. For much of the remainder of the course, we are going to walk through many different home repairs, and populate our home repair book.

Please do NOT skip hardcopying this. The whole idea is to have a set of notes to work from in case power is out or data services are down.

TASK: Gather EVERY owners manual you have for every appliance and device. Start a library area for these. Whether an old file cabinet, a dedicated book shelf, etc. One place to go to. Arrange them in a way that benefits you.

TASK: Google and download softcopies of these manuals as well.

We start home repair items tomorrow. These manuals are the baseline materials used in troubleshooting and repair.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

Nutrition

Yes, we’ve been at this for a whole work week now, and today is the last day! Have you been taking notes? Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Continue putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

We’re going shopping tomorrow so ensure you’re keeping up with this!

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

While we are sheltering at home, getting home can be very important. Furthermore, being able to find a family member who may be stranded is also important. Yesterday, we made maps to and from our workplaces and home’, and started really paying attention to our route. We’re going to keep that up.

TASK: On your normal way to work (Route 1), observe the route for natural hazards such as low areas, high traffic intersections, and other known issues. Also, observe for potential resources such as hardware stores, bike shops (if your vehicle becomes inoperative and it’s a long commute), water sources, and shelter areas. Note them on your maps.

Training

The rescue section and shelter section are also the training for today!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 5

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 5. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

No tasks for Air today!

Shelter

Yesterday we googled a list of common household repairs and took an honest assessment of if we’d be able to do them or not. Today, we’re going to pick one that we are reasonably sure about and check our assessment.

TASK: Take one home repair project you know you can do and “walk through it” step by step. Ensure your assessment of your skills was correct.

TASK: Print this repair process and add it to a Home Repair notebook. Add notes that apply to your specific make/model/situation.

This will be a common task going forth, with each day understanding a new home repair item.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

Nutrition

Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Continue putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

We’re going shopping on Saturday so ensure you’re keeping up with this!

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

While we are sheltering at home, getting home can be very important. Furthermore, being able to find a family member who may be stranded is also important. Yesterday, we made maps to and from our workplaces and home’, and started really paying attention to our route. We’re going to keep that up.

TASK: On your normal way to work (Route 1), observe the route for natural hazards such as low areas, high traffic intersections, and other known issues. Also, observe for potential resources such as hardware stores, bike shops (if your vehicle becomes inoperative and it’s a long commute), water sources, and shelter areas. Note them on your maps.

Training

The rescue section and shelter section are also the training for today!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 4

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 4. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

No tasks for Air today!

Shelter

Remember, we are most concerned with Shelter At Home. But in some conditions, we will need to fortify and repair the home so it can continue to shelter us.

The past couple days we assessed our tools and made a list of what we needed against a general list. We also assessed what actions we might need to take in an emergency and assessed ‘consumables’ like wood and hardware. We then ensured these items were in our tool list.

Today, we are going to hold off a bit on adding to our shopping list and do an honest assessment of ourselves and our skills to accomplish these things. Keyword: Honest.

TASK: Google the terms “simple woodworking project”, “simple home electrical repairs”, and “simple plumbing repairs”. Look at the terminology, the steps, and the tools needed. Honestly assess if you could do these or not.

For woodworking, here’s an interesting page:
https://cutthewood.com/inspiration/cool-woodworking-projects#woodworkers-workbench

For electrical repairs, here’s a good page:
https://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/repair/how-to-do-home-electrical-repairs.htm

And for plumbing:
https://www.familyhandyman.com/plumbing/the-top-10-plumbing-fixes/

Take a look at the articles and do an honest assessment of your skills. Could you do some of these repairs? Could you do them without internet or youtube? If you find your skills lacking in some of these, it might not be a bad idea to watch a few videos on how to do things, and even start a small library of printouts for the more common ones.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

Nutrition

Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Continue putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

We’re going shopping on Saturday so ensure you’re keeping up with this!

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

While we are sheltering at home, getting home can be very important. Furthermore, being able to find a family member who may be stranded is also important. Yesterday, we made maps to and from our workplaces and home’, and started really paying attention to our route. We’re going to keep that up.

TASK: On your normal way to work (Route 1), observe the route for natural hazards such as low areas, high traffic intersections, and other known issues. Also, observe for potential resources such as hardware stores, bike shops (if your vehicle becomes inoperative and it’s a long commute), water sources, and shelter areas. Note them on your maps.

Training

The rescue section and shelter section are also the training for today!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 3

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 3. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

No tasks for Air today!

Shelter

Remember, we are most concerned with Shelter At Home. But in some conditions, we will need to fortify and repair the home so it can continue to shelter us.

With our tools assessed (but not yet ordered, it’s just on your To-Do list), we need materials. The average homeowner should have a reasonable supply of 2×4’s, a few sheets of plywood, and a supply of screws and nails. Look over the stuff you have laying around. Could you board some windows, make some repairs, rig something up?

TASK: Assess the threats you face (hurricanes, tornados, etc) that would affect your home and the steps you want to mitigate them. If it’s boarding up windows, start accumulating the plywood or other materials to do so. Figure out how they will attach to the house, and what hardware you will need to do so. Use FB Marketplace, Craigslist, or other used sources to get these materials cheaply.

Pro tip: Carpenter’s screws that use a Torx bit rather than a Phillips head are far easier to work with and do not strip out like a Phillips screw does.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

Nutrition

Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Continue putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

While we are sheltering at home, getting home can be very important. Furthermore, being able to find a family member who may be stranded is also important.

For today’s task, we’re going to develop a set of maps that the family references. If you have the means, DeLorme atlases are excellent, but it is just as easy to print (yes, hardcopy!) maps these days.

Print one set of maps for home, and one for each driving-age person or vehicle.

First, identify where your home is, as well as workplaces and all other frequently visited places (such as your kids’ school, daycares, family friends, etc). DO NOT MARK THESE ON YOUR MAPS, rather, mark a major intersection near them. If the maps fall into the wrong hands in an emergency, you don’t necessarily want to give the locations of an obviously well-prepared family away.

In math, when a value is shifted, the ‘prime’ symbol is used. so value X would become X’. With the tick after. We’ll use that nomenclature here.

Mark HOME’ on the map, as well as WORK1′, WORK2′, etc. There are lots of businesses and it may be hard for someone to anticipate where you’re at. For schools, do NOT use school’, just use generic waypoint names, such as WAYPOINT’, and have a nearby main intersection marked.

On the map, draw out your normal route to that location. Label it SPOUSE1ROUTE 1, SPOUSE2ROUTE1, or some such.

TASK: On your normal way to work (Route 1), observe the route for natural hazards such as low areas, high traffic intersections, and other known issues. Also, observe for potential resources such as hardware stores, bike shops (if your vehicle becomes inoperative and it’s a long commute), water sources, and shelter areas. Note them on your maps.

Training

The rescue section is also the training for today!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 2

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 2. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

In the Day 1 post, the task was to determine if your inventories included at least a decent dust/particulate mask for you and your family. There was also a reference to a decent explanation on different masks and qualities.

TASK: Determine the threat conditions you face near your home and work. Determine the most appropriate masks for your needs. Determine their durations. Put getting them on your To-Do list.

Shelter

Remember, we are most concerned with Shelter At Home. But in some conditions, we will need to fortify and repair the home so it can continue to shelter us. Most people have a basic tool kit, but if you do not, it is now time to assess what you do have and fill in what you don’t.

Here is an excellent home set of tools to start out:
https://www.sears.com/craftsman-450-piece-mechanic-s-tool-set/p-A010318153?plpSellerId=Sears&prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

In addition to this set, you should have:

  • Hammers
  • Rubber Mallet
  • Crowbar
  • Hatchet
  • Pipe Wrench
  • Power drill (cordless)
  • Circular Saw
  • Tape Measure
  • Pliers set with side cutters
  • Utility Knife
  • Stud finder
  • Wood glue
  • Super glue
  • Duct tape
  • Oil filter wrench
  • Saw horses
  • Clamps

TASK: Assess your tool needs, including any specialty or odd tools needed for your situation. Compare this list to your tool inventory. Identify all gaps and add getting the needed tools to your To-Do list.

An example of an odd tool… I have a utility tractor. It occasionally requires the engine bolts tightened to the frame. It takes a 19mm wrench to do so. Once identified, this required tool was obtained. I have several tractor implements that have even larger bolts. Once identified, a 3/4″ drive bar wrench was needed with sockets of the appropriate size. These are in addition to the kit above.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

On Day 1, we started saving/sourcing 2-liter bottles. These are excellent containers because they are relatively sturdy, tolerate stacking, and are a very effective quantity vs weight physical characteristic. Ideally the 2-liter bottles were used for water originally. If they were used for soda, ensure they are cleaned very thoroughly as sugar can allow growth of things we’d rather not drink. Don’t forget cleaning the cap and the cap threading.

TASK: Find a place you will be storing your water supplies. It should be dark, and ideally cool.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

NOTE: To disinfect water, 4 drops per 2-liter bottle is the correct ratio, however, adding bleach to the water now (to store it) does no real good. Bleach will remain effective as a disinfectant for about 24 hours in water. If you are uncertain about your storage water purity, add bleach to the water before you use it, not as you store it.

Additionally, if you’d rather buy purpose-made storage containers for water, go for it. It’s a bit out of budget for this exercise, but there can be distinct advantages.

Nutrition

Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Start putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

A flashlight in every room, and on you. That’s the goal. There should literally be a small flashlight in easy reach in every location you spend time. Your dad chair? Flashlight in the coffee table next to it. Computer desk? Flashlight on it. Bed? Flashlight in the night stand. Car? Flashlight in the center console or the door tray.

In addition to these flashlights, carry one. Tactical flashlights are cool-guy gear. Get one.

TASK: Collect all the flashlights you have in your junk drawers and put them in useful places that are near the areas you actually dwell. Find a smallish one and keep it on you.

Lastly, have one “high capacity” flashlight, or better, two. These are the lights that will have reasonable brightness for a good long while.

TASK: Have at least one long duration flashlight. Your small lights have one job: Get you to your big light.

TASK: Make a recurring schedule in your To-Do list to replace flashlight batteries at least 1/year.

Training

Yes, we have to learn stuff. Your training should include:

  • Basic home repairs
  • Basic automotive repair
  • Basic equipment repairs (chainsaws, tractors, tools, etc).
  • Navigation
  • First Aid
  • Self defense
  • Communications
  • Adverse condition and tactical driving
  • Home skills (sewing, food preparation/preservation)

TASK: Assess your skillset in the above areas and identify if any are missing. Based on your skills, research what you most need extra training in. Enroll in at least one of those training subjects.

SHAMELESS PLUG: Emergency preparedness planning is a very important skill set. Keep and Bear, LLC offers training in developing plans. Do it!
http://keepandbearllc.com/product/28sep2019-emergency-preparedness-1/