Protection training during Stay-At-Home

Most of the USA is now closed for business. For many of us, we have lost access to martial training and firing ranges. This doesn’t mean we should be putting our protective training on hold, though. Here are a few ways to adapt or develop new training methods.

Strength and cardio training

There are honestly thousands of books, videos, and other sources out there for this training. For protection, a definite balance between strength training and cardio is needed. Look for strength-increase and flexibility-increase videos, not just “bulking up” exercises. The same with cardio.

Strength and cardio training by “definitely not me” and “also not my wife”.

If you don’t happen to have any equipment at home, add “no equipment” to your google searches. There are still many exercises that can be done using body weight resistance, as well as stretches!

Practice the basics you DO know

There are a number of martial arts apps out there that show applications you can do from your screen. We advise against these because there is no instruction or critique to break you from a bad habit or incorrect movement. Without this, imperfections (vulnerabilities) can become ingrained and need to be relearned.

But, if you happened to have trained well before this self-distancing, AND if you know some moves well enough to have not been significantly corrected on, continue practicing them!

I can honestly say that when troubleshooting trainee technique at the dojo, most of the trainee issues stemmed from improper positioning caused by poor footwork. If your training includes footwork patterns or routines, do them over and over, taking care you are doing them well.

Punching bags and artificial targets

Percussion training is kinda hard to get wrong. With some basic combinations under your belt, train them, and train them hard. Work them into a cardiovascular workout. If you have the means, a torso target allows you to work on target selection far better than a punching bag, but be prepared to load it up with sand (they leak a bit, don’t use water) to make it stable.

Physically striking is far superior to “punch into the air” martial movement. there is no substitute for actual striking to ensure your fists or chopping hand strikes are resilient.

Another great tool are the Cold Steel line of melee training weapons and the Rings Blue Gun line of firearm training weapons. These can allow for great weapon manipulation and movement training. If your martial skills involve breakfalls and rollouts, practice going into prone, supine, and urban prone. This will not only improve your ability to obtain cover/concealment, but the large movements will improve cardio.

Dry fire dry fire dry fire

When practicing dry fire, set up a place that you know is safe, and keep it that way. The rules of gun safety are not suspended while doing this; they are more important than ever.

Safety steps:

  1. Pick a dry-fire location in the home free from others, including pets or important valuable. Establish that this sectioned area is an ammunition-free zone.
  2. Ensure the area you will be dry ‘firing’ into is safe, and what is beyond it is safe and will trap a bullet if all else fails.
  3. Read your owners manual and confirm that firing on an empty chamber is not detrimental to your firearm. Most modern semiautomatic and revolver firearms are able to handle dry firing. 22LR pistols are a notable exception.
  4. In a separate area, remove all ammunition from your firearm. This includes the magazine and chamber or the cylinder for most modern pistols. If you have a training barrel for your firearm, install it here. Confirm the firearm is empty through sight and touch.
  5. Move to your dry fire location. Ensure it is free of obstructions and people.
  6. Reconfirm the firearm is empty through sight and touch.
  7. If for any reason you must pause this training and leave the area, perform all safety steps over to ensure the firearm and training area are in known states when resuming training.

Dry fire for sight alignment and trigger congtrol

A training program I took emphasized that most firearm issues can be resolved with sight alignment and trigger control. After spending a full 8 hours on these two factors alone, I am in complete agreement.

Fortunately, these two factors can be practiced without ammunition. When dry firing, you can work on maintaining sight alignment and picture while manipulating the trigger. These items are the very fundamentals of superior marksmanship, and it can be done for FREE.

  1. Perform all safety steps noted above.
  2. Practice dry firing by squeezing the trigger while maintaining sight alignment/picture on a target fastened to the wall.
  3. Pay special attention to any movement in sight alignment that trigger actuation provokes. Correct it. There is no rush here, and each trigger pull can take as long as needed to perfect.
  4. Repeat until your trigger actuation does not affect sight alignment/picture at all. (This can take years!)

Dry fire for draw and acquiring target

Once the fundamentals of sight alignment and trigger control are well understood, it’s time to bring the drawstroke into play. Using ALL the same safety steps shown above, AND all the sight alignment/picture and trigger control exercises, practice drawing from holster, presenting the firearm, and getting on target with a proper sight alignment and trigger actuation.

Remember the fundamentals of a good drawstroke:

  1. Using support hand, remove concealing garments from the holster area.
  2. Primary hand acquire a solid grip on the firearm with thumb-forefinger webbing lodged firmly in the tang of the handgun and fingers in a solid grip. Trigger finger must be extended.
  3. Draw the firearm deliberately to the pectoral index point. Support hand comes to the chest.
  4. Rotate firearm to the front. Shooter may need to engage from this position and firing from this position should be practiced for close quarter engagements.
  5. Extend the firearm forward with a “punching out” movement. Support hand should naturally acquire a proper grip on the firearm during this extension. During extension, begin to acquire sight alignment and sight picture. Shooter should be able to put rounds on target during the extension action for close quarter engagement training.
  6. Once at extension, finalize sight alignment and sight picture.
  7. Actuate trigger during the drill at the appropriate time determined for your practice.

Dry fire with moving and shooting

Using ALL the above steps, and adding in objects, navigate to cover/concealment, move around obstacles to get on cover. Add partial cover to your target… the list is endless what you can do here, and it all builds in movement familiarity with the firearm.

By now it should be apparent that there is so much that can be done with dry fire. In fact, the only thing missing is recoil management and the assessment of shot placement.

Train the mind

Internet research costs little, and finding good sources doesn’t take that long. Train the mind with good information. Justifiable use of force, the laws of protection and firearm ownership, the anatomy of violence, and so much more. Go for depth, not breadth. Find a subject and truly deep-dive it. Surface smatterings of many topics are easily obtained. Focused knowledge in one thing leads to much more understanding.

Training beyond stay-at-home

Of course, ALL of this must be reinforced with this most paramount of paradigms: You are NOT PLAYING. This isn’t a tactical LARPing exercise, Mr. Wick. You MUST do all the above training as if it is a live-fire exercise, with the exact same mindset for training and consequence. Do not train in poor muzzle discipline. Do NOT train in a bad drawstroke. If needed, record your training and play it back and scrutinize as if it were someone else’s Facebook post that the world will nitpick into oblivion. You could even send it to your instructors for their review, or a close group of training friends operating in an ego-free way.

Most of us have been ‘gifted’ with extra time on our hands. Whether it be working from home and no commute time to actually being furloughed. These times are hard, and they will get harder before it’s said and done. In desperate times, the worst in some people comes out, and the best in others comes out. It’s up to us to ensure our best is greater than their worst. Train hard, train focused.

Don’t drink the water (before filtering!)

Living in the Great State of Michigan it is said that you are never more than 20 miles from a major body of water; fresh water to boot! The Great Lake State has fresh water that is the envy of the world, and rightly so. Its beautiful, fun and vitally critical to life as we know it; but sometimes we take that last part for granted!

If you haven’t considered what you’d do if the water suddenly stopped flowing through your taps I’d encourage you to look into it. Keep & Bear has a wonderful Emergency Preparedness class that addresses the need for clean H2O. It is an important topic but I want to talk about something else that can be overlooked: How do you get clean water on the move?

My wife and I enjoy traveling. To date we have been to some beautiful places. In our travels we rarely go the ‘tourist resort’ route and routinely find ourselves in places lacking in the creature comforts of most of
the USA. Clean water is chief among them.

While bottled water can be available, carrying the amount needed isn’t always practical. The rivers, lakes, streams, and waterfalls may be all around, but they are often teaming with microscopic organisms hostile to the human digestive tract. The solution is finding a way to filter out the bad and keep the good.

Thankfully you and I don’t have to figure out how to do this (at least in its basic form). The wonders of the free market have done it for us. Prior to our last trip to South America my wife researched and purchased a water purification bottle. She settled on the Grayl Ultralight Compact Purifier. This bottle was designed to fit in backpacks and be easily transported. With a 16 ounce capacity it could filtered out waterborne pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoan cysts), including Rotavirus, Hepatitis A, Norovirus, Giardiasis, Cryptosporidium, E. Coli, Cholera, Salmonella, Dysentery along with pesticides and heavy metals. It could turn contaminated water in to drinking water in 15 seconds! Its filter is good for 40 gallons and is replaceable when its limit is reached.

Using the bottle is simple. From as clean a water source as can be found, fill the “cup” part of the device to the fill line. Place it on a firm surface, then insert the inner assembly. The o-rings at the bottom keep the water from simply displacing up and out of the cup. The downward force the user puts on the inner assembly forces the water through the orange filter housing and filter. The filtered water is then forced into the clear reservoir area where it is stored until used. The bottom o-rings and the lip at the top ensure unfiltered water doesn’t have a sneak path along the outside of the inner assembly and into one’s mouth when tilted up to drink.

With this little bottle we were able to climb Machu Picchu, hang out in Cusco, and explore the Sacred Valley of Peru. We never had to worry about our water or risked getting sick! For traveling I can’t think of a better thing to bring along. Of course its not limited to just traveling. There are many instances where something has happened to the local water supply (broken water main, contaminates in the system, Flint…) where having an effective water purifier on had would be invaluable.

Berge, Kim, and a Fitbit reading 86,372 flights of stairs. Achievement unlocked!

I use Grayl and its line of purifiers, whether this works for you or not, I highly recommend you find one for yourself!

This old revolver

Last month I got my hands on an old revolver my uncle had back when he was a cop some 40 years ago. I was, as always, excited to get a new gun in my hands, even if it was 40 years old. It was clear that the pistol, a snub nose .38 S&W, had not been fired for a long time. It was not dirty on the frame and the cylinder spun freely. The trigger pull was smooth and gave no sign of dangerous wear that could cause a failure. I ran a cleaning cloth across the pistol and was excited to add it to my collection.

photo by Berge Avesian

Later that week I grabbed a box of paper punching .38s and headed to the range. The first rounds down the barrel were smooth and surprisingly accurate for a snubby. Both double action trigger and single action trigger pulls were smooth and broke crisply and I was pleased with the gun. After 50 rounds I put it away and headed home, planning to give it a good cleaning later.

The next day I pulled it out of my safe to clean it, opened it up and discovered the cylinder would barely rotate. Closing the cylinder, both the trigger and the hammer would barely budge. I couldn’t believe 50 rounds of 38s would foul a gun so much.  I set to cleaning and oiling the pistol using M-Pro 7 foaming gun cleaner and Kleen Bore gun oil. When I was done the cylinder spun freely and the trigger and hammer moved smoothly.

Satisfied I had fixed the problem and cleaned the pistol well, it went back into my safe.  Looking at it the next day the same problems returned! It seems that the built up carbon from 40 years past was loosened and heated in the process of firing it and when cooled it gummed up the pistol.  My original cleaning would have been adequate for a pistol that was well maintained. This pistol needed a much deeper cleaning.

 I set to taking apart the revolver and removing the cylinder from the arm.  Bingo! 40 years of carbon fouling smeared off the cylinder arm. This gun was dirty!  

After a complete and thorough cleaning and oiling I’m pleased to report that the gun functions like new and there is no evidence of any old dirty carbon on the gun!  The lesson learned even if it looks clean, when you get your hands on a new (to you) gun, your first order of business is a thorough cleaning!

Happy Shooting!

Surefire E2D Exec Defender Tactical Flashlight -Final Review

It is with a not-so-heavy heart that I retire my Surefire E2D Exec Defender with the bulb (not LED!) as my EDC light. This light has been a part of my EDC and in my EDC pocket for literally a decade now.

I first started carrying the Surefire E2D as part of my martial training. We were focusing on modern protective implements that could be carried discretely every day. Outside a firearm and knife, the tactical pen and flashlight top the list in this regard for non-LEO carry. Their build is robust enough to use as a weapon, and proper shopping gets you something non-threatening in appearance for casual and discreet EDC.

Having a flashlight on my person was a game changer. There are many tasks we do where we “get by” with no augmented illumination, like when your black wallet falls under your car seat which has black upholstery, and it’s dusk. We can feel around for it, taking time, or just light up the space and grab and go. Similarly looking in bags, engine compartments, and any other tight space. Extra illumination is always a benefit (unless you still work in a photography darkroom).

When the LED lights started hitting the market, the argument was made that the solid state component was more durable than a bulb with a filament. I’ll concede that this is very likely the case. The part of the analysis that is left out, though, is whether the bulb is robust enough for its role. In other words, just because the LED might be better at enduring impact, does it mean that the bulb is inadequate?

I have a sample size of one. My E2D bulb light. During my 10 years with that light, I have used it as my primary illumination during low light shooting (support hand carry), primary illumination for a couple night navigation classes, and outdoor activities. I have run approximately 20 Personal Protection classes using it, and been a part of at least that many as a participant. These classes involve using the light to strike Bob (our assortment of torso targets) over and over, with different strike types, strike trajectories, etc. During these, the light is exercised as a possible blinding opportunity. Shine Bob’s eyes briefly and strike him. In short, I probably have well over 10k strikes with this same E2D in that time frame. Let’s be clear on some results:

  • 10 years of EDC use. Includes pocket use, wear, drops, etc. Includes indoor/outdoor use from 0 degF – 100 degF with Michigan humidity.
  • Approximately 40 classes, and personal practice, resulting in approximately 10,000 strikes on a torso target.
  • Minor transferred recoil force from low-light firearm training.
  • ZERO failures to illuminate due to (non-battery) issues.
  • ZERO bulb replacements.
  • ZERO switch issues.
  • ZERO non-cosmetic damage to the hull or bezel.
  • The E2D still functions.

Again, I have a sample size of 1 flashlight. Statistically that isn’t great certainty until you account for how far beyond ‘normal use’ this one sample has gone. For those discounting the longevity of a bulb, I’d have to argue against their stance.

So why switch now? In all honesty, I am not one for the latest gadget and gear for my protection-intent equipment. There is a wisdom in delayed-adoption of new technology. Performance gains are wonderful, but performance and reliability need to be balanced out. Since the single best place your money can be allocated is training, training can make up for the slight advantages early-adopters of new equipment have over the status quo.

Why retire this light? Basically, I want all the lumens. The E2D was a fantastic light for its era, with the bulb rated at 60 lumens output. Modern LED lights have far outshined (heh heh) this performance level, with $50 tactical-ish lights hitting 500 lumens. Dedicated gear like the Surefire E2D LED light will crank out 1000 lumens and has a low and high setting to help balance intensity vs duration needs.

In short, the LED technology has completely obsoleted the bulb light in this case. For a reasonable cost I can get over 10x the lumens. With the equivalent model E2D LED I have identical form factor. The only thing that has changed is brighter light and lighter wallet.

Training progression

We often get trainees who want their Michigan Concealed Pistol License, but could use some extra work on shooting fundamentals. Many of our trainees who pass the CPL shooting requirements voluntarily go back and brush up on basics. We are incredibly thankful to have such dedicated trainees who take the responsibilities of being armed that seriously.

Similarly, we have many trainees who get their CPL and want to go beyond the “proficiency demonstration” of the CPL class to improve their skills and prepare them for the parameters present in an actual altercation. We applaud this, and have multiple offerings that do just that.

Note that we are not “all about the gun”. We emphasize physical force training as well, and are happy to refer students to qualified intermediate force training venues as well.

This is our training map. The courses we have, and the progression we recommend taking them in, to help equip our students with protection proficiency.

2020 Class offerings available

Our site is up with the currently scheduled 2020 class offerings. Our current fare continues to include our standard classes:

  • Family Firearm Safety
  • Essential Handgun
  • Michigan Concealed Pistol
  • Michigan CPL Renewal
  • Martial Gunfighting
  • Firearm Cleaning and Maintenance
  • Personal Protection
  • Tactical Tomahawk
  • Emergency Preparedness 1
  • Emergency Preparedness 2

Additionally, we are in the process of securing a venue to host our intermediate classes:

  • Intermediate Handgun 1: Foundational skills for operating the handgun in a protection-intent situation.
  • Intermediate Handgun 2: Environmental factors for operating the handgun in a protection situation (protective moment, cover/concealment).

Lastly, we are excited to announce our latest class, Emergency Preparedness 3! This class will be hands-on with YOUR emergency kit and contents. Building shelter, purifying water, starting fire, and more! Expect situational considerations and survival prioritization to be a big part of what you will face.

We sincerely hope you are getting trained up to protect you and your circle, regardless of the nature of the threats we may face. Whether through us or other great educators, investing in your skill set is the most value for your dollars you can get.

Safe travels

With the holiday season approaching, many families will be setting out by car or mass transit to other destinations. Whether to escape the frigid winter or visit family, this escape from routine brings up a few questions to the protection and preparedness mindset. Here’s some common concerns…

IMPORTANT: We are not lawyers and we did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. It REMAINS the reader’s responsibility to determine the legalities of protection tools and actions in the various governing body regions in which they travel.

Can I take my handgun in my vehicle (no CPL)?

In general, the Firearms Owners Protection Act of 1986 created a “Safe Passage” clause in the US Code that allowed for interstate travel with a firearm (unloaded, not accessible to vehicle occupants). The stipulation was that if the firearm was legal to possess at the departure point, and legal to possess at the destination point, then the owner was immune to all strict gun control measures in between. This supposed that the “in between” did not include anything other than brief stops (food, gas, bio-breaks, overnight lodging as necessary).

It should be noted that many over-zealous legislatures and LEO’s have made stops on people, and pressed charges, based on characteristics of the firearm that were made illegal in state/municipality areas. Local laws such as magazine size restrictions, or other firearm features are often attempted to be prosecuted despite the safe passage laws.

If you are traveling, be sure to review the laws in each state you will be traveling through, as well as the levels in which states restrict the rights of the people. Know the laws, know the prescribed method of transport, and drive in such a manner that your “just passing through” goes unnoticed.

Can I take my handgun in my vehicle (with CPL)?

Because each state infringes on the Second Amendment to varying degrees, and because Concealed Pistol Licenses are handled at the state level, navigating where you can and cannot carry concealed with your CPL can be challenging. Many states have ‘reciprocity’ with one another: they will honor your CPL in their state since people from their state have theirs honored while visiting your state. Driver’s licenses enjoy this reciprocity state-to-state throughout the nation. CPL isn’t as encompassing, yet.

To start, look at every single state you will drive through. Then go to a website that is devoted to concealed carry reciprocity and see the results. DON’T STOP THERE. Trusting some web site isn’t the best move in the world. A good reciprocity map will have links to the attorney generals’ opinions from each state granting reciprocity. Review these carefully. Heck, even print them and put them in a small notebook. If you encounter a preference-enforcing government official, you will have access to the determination right there. At the very least, you will be able to demonstrate you did due-diligence before your travels.

IMPORTANT: You must carry concealed in a manner prescribed by the state you are in, and follow THEIR laws when carrying concealed. In Michigan, a “no gun” sign carries little legal weight. You must leave the premises if told to. In some states, that no-gun sign has rule of law. There are many other differences about where, when, and how concealed carry is permitted. You must know them all for each state you travel.

Big ole jet airliner… Flying with your firearm.

In public aircraft (not a private charter airplane), you may obviously not bring your firearm in carry-on with you. You must put in in checked baggage.

The TSA has this to say on the matter:

  • Firearms must be unloaded.
  • Firearms must be in a locked hard sided case. Only you should have the key.
  • Firearms must be declared to the airlines when checking the baggage.
  • Ammunition must be in checked baggage only.
  • Ammunition must be transported in a box designed to transport ammunition.

Similar to the “Safe Passage” rules above, the firearm must be legal to own at your departure point and at the landing point.

An interesting side note occurs when you must retrieve your baggage by exiting the secured area of the airport, getting baggage, then checking in to a connecting flight (say, 2 different airlines). There have been at least a couple instances were the authorities have been summoned because the firearm had characteristics not legal in that area. Depending on the political climate, this can be as simple as going on your way, or as complicated as “we will be making a lesson of you”.

If your flight has connections that require you to retrieve your checked baggage, understand the procedures for getting your baggage to the new check in area. If the flight is unanticipatedly diverted, talk to the airline crew once you exit the plane to make plans to have your carry-on moved by them, without you reclaiming it at baggage claim.

Always call ahead to your airlines to understand any accommodations that must be made by their policies. In a line at the airport is not a good place for a learn-as-you-go experience.

IMPORTANT: If you regularly use your trusty ole daypack as a range bag, and plan to use it as a carry on, spend a ridiculous amount of time ensuring there is no ammunition in the bag. Too many people are put in small rooms with uncomfortable chairs and subjected to questioning from officials from unfriendly.gov simply because of a few stray rounds of niner mike mike they didn’t shoot up last Saturday…

Do people still take trains?

Trains have a very similar policy as airlines. Firearms must be packaged appropriately, and in checked baggage. Amtrack has guidelines here.

International travel

The USA infringes on peoples’ firearm rights to a lesser extent than most other governments in the world. That being said, there are a number of countries that will honor your ability to own a firearm, though most will not honor your ability to carry it, concealed or otherwise. Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Panama, and South Africa have relatively easy to access CPL requirements.

First, before your departure, understand how to fly with your firearm. You’ll want to declare your firearm to Customs using the Form 4457 and get it signed. This helps your return to the US with that firearm as proof it was not acquired abroad.

Know where the US Embassy is when going abroad, and have that phone number recorded.

Knowledge and skills are not subject to laws

We regularly promote training beyond the gun. Everything from situational awareness to first aid courses to strong physical-level martial classes. These are where protection begins. Awareness gives you the much needed “heads up” something is amiss. Physical force gives you an edge no matter the type of conflict. Whether just confidence (there are nonverbal cues a person who knows how to handle himself gives off), the ability to repel a non-lethal attack, or the skills to get at your firearm in a mixed-force attack, martial skills come into play across the entire use of force spectrum.

These skills prepare you for interpersonal conflict. These cannot be outlawed (knowledge cannot be contained by any government entity). They cannot be seized at the border, and they do not rely on the possession of a thing in order to work (though weapons enhance these skills).

2019 In The Books!

We (Berge and Don) have had an amazing year with the opportunity to train some of the finest peaceable and responsible students. We are regularly honored and humbled at the trust you, our students, place in us. The skills we practice in are life and death, readiness for an encounter, preparedness for when bad things happen, and so much more. We do not take our roles in this regard lightly, and we both draw from our knowledge, training, and experiences to deliver you the most up to date, and grounded in reality information we can.

We had an excellent shooting season! Our classes were small enough (we do not want to be a 30+ student classroom) to be able to provide a very favorable instructor to student ratio which really allowed us to focus in on the drills being presented and the foundational skills necessary to master them.

In addition to a great shooting season, this year we had record attendance in our martial offerings (Personal Protection and Tactical Tomahawk) and our Emergency Preparedness (EP 1 and EP2) offerings, with our alumni stepping up to use our coupon codes. We are very thankful for this! The threats we face as Michigan individuals and families isn’t always a lethal force encounter, and isn’t even always an interpersonal conflict.

As we look to 2020, we will be offering more classes, with a return of our Intermediate Handgun series (levels 1 and 2), and a level 3 series of our Emergency Preparedness course later in the year.

Join us!

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 7

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 7. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Are you almost done with it?

Air

Early last week we identified some air filters that are suitable for your family’s needs in your area. We made a note of them and even revisited the subject and made sure. Time to Add to Cart.

TASK: Add the air filters to cart. Purchase the air filters needed.

Amazon Prime memberships are great for this sort of thing. They have a dizzying array of product and free shipping on many items.

Shelter

Earlier this week we did a tool and equipment assessment. If your finances are able, fill in the tools and equipment you do not have. This includes tools as well as hardware like fasteners and raw materials like 2×4’s and plywood.

TASK: Purchase or otherwise obtain the tools you need. Keep an eye on Facebook Marketplace or Craigslist for materials.

Hydration

Today we take a break from filling 2 liter bottles. Let’s talk about water and what it means to have clean water. Ideally in our bottles we have H2O, only H2O, and nothing else but H2O. In reality, that isn’t the case. We have as couple terminology points:

Purification: Water purification is the act of ensuring only H2O is in our water container. It consists primarily of filtration and disinfecting.

Filtration: The act of passing water through a medium such that impurities are captured by the medium and not allowed to pass though. Real world filtration may not catch all impurities and some viruses are smaller than filter elements. Improper filtering technique can also allow impurities to make it through the system.

Disinfection: The act of rendering impurities in the water inert. Disinfection is primarily done through an additive, such as chlorine tablets or iodine tablets. Ultraviolet light is now becoming more common with sterilization “pens” that are immersed in the container and emit light to kill viruses and other microorganisms.

Nutrition

For the past week we have been assessing our food needs. Today, we are looking at the lists we’ve made. These should be foods and ingredients that are in long term, medium term, and short term categories.

Indefinite term foods might be good for a year or more. Virtually all canned goods are long term foods. dried rice, dry pasta, wheat berries, sugar, honey, and many more ingredients are long term. These are EXCELLENT foods to stock up on.

Long term goods will keep for a week or so, and ideally without refrigeration. Some commercial baked goods like cookies, crackers, butter, syrups, and more fit this category. These are also great items to stock up on for a week of preparedness.

Short term goods will go bad within about a week, especially with loss of refrigeration. Milk, prepared vegetables, breads, and other foods of this nature are short term. These are poor items to “stock up” on, but in the event of an emergency are OK to get prior to, but understand they may not last.

TASK: Stock up on long and indefinite term food item inventory suitable for one person for an entire week. 3 meals a day, 2000 calories each day, and something they identify as “food” (not MREs or other emergency rations that may be alien to them).

TASK: Establish a FIFO (first in, first out) system in your pantry.

The objective is not to have these emergency foods in some bin or set aside. The objective is to have extra foods in your pantry so that if an emergency happens, you have inventory.

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

This week we made maps to our workplaces and other frequently traveled areas and have been observing useful resources and concerns.

TASK: On your maps, mark main routes as the primary route taken and ensure all resources and concerns are noted. Mark off waypoints along the way and name them. These should be easy to understand features.

Training

Enroll at least one family member in a First Aid, CPR, AED course.

30-Day Preparedness Challenge: Day 6

Welcome to the Keep and Bear, LLC 30 Day Preparedness Challenge! We are on Day 6. If you are just joining us, please go to the intro post to learn more.

The purpose of this ‘challenge’ is to provide a paced and measured plan to fulfill some basic family preparedness needs. These needs are real-world, and applicable to the average family.

The below headings are the main survival priorities.

Positive Mental Attitude

In the Day 1 post, the task was to pick a book relating to positive mental attitude. To expand on that, it can be a book on success or mental improvement, such as the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (a great resource), but it can also be about developing mental tenacity. If you haven’t already, google “books on positive mental attitude” or “books on success” and pick one you are interested in.

TASK: Read at least one chapter in your PMA book.

Air

No tasks for Air today!

Shelter

Yesterday we did an assessment of our skill set AND we started a common home repair book. For much of the remainder of the course, we are going to walk through many different home repairs, and populate our home repair book.

Please do NOT skip hardcopying this. The whole idea is to have a set of notes to work from in case power is out or data services are down.

TASK: Gather EVERY owners manual you have for every appliance and device. Start a library area for these. Whether an old file cabinet, a dedicated book shelf, etc. One place to go to. Arrange them in a way that benefits you.

TASK: Google and download softcopies of these manuals as well.

We start home repair items tomorrow. These manuals are the baseline materials used in troubleshooting and repair.

Hydration

We are going for 1 gallon of potable water per person per day for up to 7 days. That means with a family of 4, we need 28 gallons. This is a bare-bones amount suitable for average exertion in temperate weather. If you’re dealing with high exertion and hot weather, double the requirement.

TASK: Clean and fill at least two 2-liter bottles.

As a heads up, we will be filling two 2-liter bottles each weeknight for the entire challenge. If you would rather knock this out in one fell swoop, go for it!

Nutrition

Yes, we’ve been at this for a whole work week now, and today is the last day! Have you been taking notes? Assess your family’s eating habits. What has short shelf lives (like bread)? What has longer shelf lives (like boxed mac n cheese)? What has nearly indefinite shelf lives (like dehydrated foods, canned goods, or dry goods)?

TASK: Continue putting together a list of typical meals and their ingredients that consist of short, long, and indefinite shelf life items. Identify completed recipes that use at least long-life ingredients.

We’re going shopping tomorrow so ensure you’re keeping up with this!

Rescue/Mitigation/Repair

While we are sheltering at home, getting home can be very important. Furthermore, being able to find a family member who may be stranded is also important. Yesterday, we made maps to and from our workplaces and home’, and started really paying attention to our route. We’re going to keep that up.

TASK: On your normal way to work (Route 1), observe the route for natural hazards such as low areas, high traffic intersections, and other known issues. Also, observe for potential resources such as hardware stores, bike shops (if your vehicle becomes inoperative and it’s a long commute), water sources, and shelter areas. Note them on your maps.

Training

The rescue section and shelter section are also the training for today!